THE BIGGER PICTURE - East Anglian artists support Campaign with a POP-UP GALLERY

The Bigger Picture: East Anglian artists back campaign to challenge UK Government plans to land offshore wind farm energy on unspoilt countryside in coastal Suffolk

A pop-up exhibition, The Bigger Picture, supported by locally-based artists in Suffolk will open to the public on Saturday, 12 September, at Gallery 152, at 152 Aldeburgh High Street, IP15 5AQ.  The exhibition will run between 11:00 and 18:00 each day, Thursdays to Mondays.  The artists exhibiting include Maggi Hambling, Emma Chichester Clark, Laurence Edwards, Annabel Gault, Kate Giles and Jelly Green.

'Wild Summer Sea' by Maggi Hambling

This exhibition is part of an ongoing campaign by local residents to build awareness of the Government’s plans to land off shore wind farm energy in some of the UK’s most precious heathland sites in coastal Suffolk and to focus attention on an upcoming BEIS Review of these proposals by Government Minister, Kwasi Kwarteng, to ensure that this Review is independently run and not a window-dressing exercise.

'Taking flight, Orford Ness' by  Caroline McAdam Clark (painting)

All monies raised by this exhibition will be used to support campaign efforts to challenge ill-conceived proposals and to shift current onshore infrastructure offshore, a more logical, cheaper and greener alternative.

For more information on this exhibition or the campaign to make green energy greener in its delivery, please contact SEAS (Suffolk Energy Action Solutions) at info@suffolkenergyactionsolutions.co.uk

A little about the campaign:

Funds raised through the sale of artwork at the exhibition will contribute to on-going campaign costs in support of local residents challenging ill-conceived plans by National Grid plc, ScottishPower Renewables and other private sector developers to land electricity cables at fragile coastal areas at Thorpeness beach, through the AONB and Sandlings SSI, together with the proposed building of numerous 18 m high electricity substations and interconnectors. Years of reviews and reports have been ignored by government departments and resulted in the need for these campaigns.

The SEAS Campaign has been calling for a Review since August 2019 and are now campaigning to ensure East Anglia One North and East Anglia Two windfarms be included in the Short Term Review Terms of.  Funds raised through the sale of artwork at the exhibition will contribute to on-going campaign costs in support of local residents challenging ill-conceived plans by National Grid plc, ScottishPower Renewables and other private sector developers to land electricity cables at fragile coastal areas at Thorpeness beach, through the AONB and Sandlings SSI, together with the proposed building of numerous 18 m high electricity substations and interconnectors. Years of reviews and reports have been ignored by government departments and resulted in the need for these campaigns.

Current plans will cover an area the size of more than 60 acres in concrete, while developers will gouge a 9km trench 60m wide through unspoilt countryside bordering the picturesque medieval Suffolk village of Friston.

The impact of this mass industrialisation will be to destroy rare habitats, heathlands, unspoilt landscape, tranquillity and well-being. The effects of these proposals will crush tourism in the region.

The SEAS campaign sets out to shift the plans for outdated and fragmented onshore infrastructure supporting the offshore wind energy by adopting modern offshore solutions, similar to plans for Germany, Holland and other North Sea countries, using offshore substation platforms (similar to oil rig platforms) and a modular offshore grid (MOG). These can then link to better alternative existing brownfield sites.

In this way, green energy plans for the UK will be based on a holistic strategy that addresses environmental concerns at the same time as achieving our zero-carbon emission targets.

Local artists support campaign challenging the UK Government to protect our coastal countryside from ill-planned and outdated Wind Farm infrastructure with

needless industrialisation

For more information about this exhibition and why wind energy transmission infrastructure should be built at sea and not on unspoilt land, please contact

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